Last edited by Milkree
Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

1 edition of Military spending, the peace dividend, and fiscal adjustment found in the catalog.

Military spending, the peace dividend, and fiscal adjustment

Military spending, the peace dividend, and fiscal adjustment

  • 58 Want to read
  • 5 Currently reading

Published by International Monetary Fund, Research Department in [Washington, D.C.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • World politics -- 1989-,
  • Peace.,
  • Economic assistance.,
  • Fiscal policy.,
  • Cold War -- Economic aspects

  • Edition Notes

    Statementprepared by Hamid Davoodi...[et. al.].
    SeriesIMF working paper -- WP/99/87
    ContributionsDavoodi, Hamid Reza., International Monetary Fund. Research Dept.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination32 p. :
    Number of Pages32
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18944441M

      Model simulation results suggest a substantial long-term peace dividend - in the form of higher capacity output per capita - that may result from (1) markedly lower military spending in most regions in the late s and (2) future cuts in military spending if global peace is secured.   Despite relative reductions, absolute levels of defense spending continued to increase. Moreover, in the first decade of the 21st century a large proportion of military spending moved "off budget," as the administration of George W. Bush funded the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars through emergency supplemental bills rather than direct appropriations.

    This paper decomposes the sources of the peace dividend into global, regional, and country-specific factors, and analyzes their relative importance. It finds that the easing of international and regional tensions and the existence of IMF-supported adjustment programs are systematically related to lower military spending and a higher share of nonmilitary spending in total government outlays. The large rise in military spending in North America in the s is due to the Reagan defense buildup. In the s, there are the peace‐dividend years following the Cold War; after 9/11, there is the ‘war on terror’ buildup of defense. Since , US defense spending fell because of budgetary considerations and sequestration.

    Military Spending, the Peace Dividend, and Fiscal Adjustment. IMF Working Paper No. 99/87 Number of pages: 32 Posted: 11 Feb military spending, peace dividend, fiscal adjustment. Expenditure Issues and Governance in Central America. IMF Working Paper No. 02/ Military Cost–Benefit Analysis: Theory and practice 1st Edition. Francois Melese, Anke Richter, Binyam Solomon Janu This is the first comprehensive book on Military Cost-Benefit Analysis and provides novel approaches to structuring cost-benefit and affordability analysis amidst an uncertain defense environment and cloudy fiscal prospects.


Share this book
You might also like
crime at Vanderlyndens

crime at Vanderlyndens

Managing yourself

Managing yourself

Good news for the partially sighted

Good news for the partially sighted

Digest of municipal air pollution ordinances.

Digest of municipal air pollution ordinances.

American dreams-- through the decades

American dreams-- through the decades

Fourth International Symposium on Automotive Propulsion Systems =

Fourth International Symposium on Automotive Propulsion Systems =

Microsoft Excel, IBM PC

Microsoft Excel, IBM PC

Review of Australias Defence Capabilities

Review of Australias Defence Capabilities

How to help an alcoholic

How to help an alcoholic

Ark two

Ark two

law & its compass

law & its compass

The Centenary Of The Car1885-1985 (The Centenary Of The Car 1885-1985)

The Centenary Of The Car1885-1985 (The Centenary Of The Car 1885-1985)

Department of Law financial and compliance audit, June 1987.

Department of Law financial and compliance audit, June 1987.

Educational television for disadvantaged adults

Educational television for disadvantaged adults

Military spending, the peace dividend, and fiscal adjustment Download PDF EPUB FB2

Benedict J. Clements & Jerald A Schiff & Peter Debaere & Hamid R Davoodi, "Military Spending, the Peace Dividend, and Fiscal Adjustment," IMF Working Papers /, International Monetary Fund. Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa/Cited by: 6.

Military Spending, the Peace Dividend, and Fiscal Adjustment. Cuts in military spending appear to have potentially important implications for non‐military spending and fiscal adjustment. MILITARY SPENDING,THE PEACE DIVIDEND,AND FISCAL ADJUSTMENT supported adjustment program presumably affects both the expenditure level and its composition.

This issue is investigated empirically later in the paper. The reduced form model (equations (9) and (10)) are specified in log-linear form as follows: (13) (14) where εit and ηit are. Military Spending, the Peace Dividend, and Fiscal Adjustment By Davoodi, Benedict Clements, Jerald Schiff, and Peter Debaere Full Text of this Article (PDF K) Download the datasets from a zip zip file contains the data, programs, and documentation files for this article.

The end of the Cold War has ushered in significant Military spending in worldwide military spending. This paper finds that the easing of (1) international tensions, (2) regional tensions, and (3) the existence of IMF-supported programs are related to lower military spending and a higher share of nonmilitary spending in total government outlays.

These factors account for up to 66 percent, 26 Cited by: 6. BibTeX @ARTICLE{Davoodi01militaryspending, author = {Hamid Davoodi and Benedict Clements and Jerald Schiff and Peter Debaere}, title = {Military spending, the peace dividend, and fiscal adjustment}, journal = {IMF Staff Papers}, year = {}, pages = {}}.

Title: Military Spending, the Peace Dividend, and Fiscal Adjustment - WP/99/87 Created Date: 7/29/ PM. Military Spending, the Peace Dividend, and Fiscal Adjustment.

By By Davoodi, Benedict Clements, Jerald Schiff and Peter Debaere. Get PDF ( KB) Abstract. This paper decomposes the sources of the peace dividend into global, regional, and country-specific factors, and analyzes their relative importance.

Reducing Unproductive Expenditures. Cuts in military spending appear to have potentially important implications for non‐military spending and fiscal adjustment. Military Spending, the Peace Dividend, and Fiscal Adjustment. Downloadable (with restrictions). This paper decomposes the sources of the peace dividend into global, regional, and country-specific factors, and analyzes their relative importance.

It finds that the easing of international and regional tensions and the existence of IMF-supported adjustment programs are systematically related to lower military spending and a higher share of nonmilitary. Military Spending, the Peace Dividend, and Fiscal Adjustment. IMF Working Paper No.

99/ Washington: International Monetary Fund. [A study of determinants of military spending, including the impact of adjustment programs.] Gupta S., Clements B., and Ruggiero E.

Worldwide Military Expenditures Continue to Fall, but at Slower Pace. Military Spending, the Peace Dividend, and Fiscal Adjustment Hamid Davoodi, Benedict Clements, Jerald Schiff, Peter Debaere Pages OriginalPaper. the impact of the peace dividend on other fiscal variables.

Nevertheless, based on the available data, it appears that reductions in military spending have not been primarily associated with increases in other spend-ing. Rather, the peace dividend has been largely returned to the private sector through lower deficits and, in some cases, lower.

Peace dividend is a political slogan popularized by US President George H.W. Bush and UK Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in the early s, purporting to describe the economic benefit of a decrease in defense spending.

It is used primarily in discussions relating to the guns versus butter term was frequently used at the end of the Cold War, when many Western nations significantly. Military Spending, the Peace Dividend, and Fiscal Adjustment. By Benedict J. Clements, Jerald Alan Schiff, Peter Debaere and Hamid Reza Davoodi.

Abstract. The end of the Cold War has ushered in significant changes in worldwide military spending. This paper finds that the easing of (1) international tensions, (2) regional tensions, and (3) the.

Hewitt, Daniel P. Military Expenditures The Reasons Behind the Post Fall in World Military Working Papers, Vol. 93, Issue. 18, p. Download PDF: Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s): (external link) http.

The Do-Nothing Strategy. Of the books under review, the most pessimistic and least visionary is Murray Weidenbaum's Small Wars, Big Defense: Paying for the Military after the Cold War, published in Weidenbaum, former chair of Ronald Reagan's Council of Economic Advisors and now director of Washington University's Center for the Study of American Business, makes the best case.

A substantial ‘peace dividend’ can be realised by reducing external and internal threats, which could help finance productive spending (including in the social sectors) to help meet the SDGs.

Furthermore, increases in social spending itself are associated with reductions in military spending, but only in developing economies. Inthe budget was at $ billion—the same year we were using our military to halt Slobodan Milosevic’s “ethnic cleansing” in Kosovo.

For fiscalDefense requested $ billion billion, including a pay raise for soldiers. The USS Cole was bombed and peacekeeping efforts continued in the usual spots like Kosovo and Bosnia. the impact of changes in military spending on other aspects of fiscal policy/ in particular nonmilitary spending and the fiscal deficit/ in order to address the issue of how the peace dividend has been used.

Section VI examines the issue of whether military spending has been resilient in periods of fiscal adjustment. When this cost is added to the NDAA budget, the total is approximately $ billion – an increase of more than 50 percent over the country’s defense spending in .The Elusive Peace Dividend.

Washington, D.C.: Defense Budget Project. [Study of the lack of the peace dividend in the United States.] BICC: Bonn International Center for Conversion ().

Conversion Survey, Global Disarmament, Demilitarization, and Demobilization, by Michael Brzoska and others. New York: Oxford University Press.